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How To Solve Johnson Outboard Troubleshooting Problems

If you have a Johnson outboard troubleshooter on your system, this user manual should help.

You can tell you have a bad stator just by looking at everything. If the stator is covered, you will find salt and corrosion. Or you are checking to see if it has melted or lost windings. So it’s almost arguable that it’s a bad thing.

The following is provided by BPS for reference only. BPS is not responsible For any loss, damage or misdiagnosis resulting from the use of this information. There is a special rule of thumb for gasoline engines with a transmission, otherwise they are 4-stroke . Compression and fire, coal, are the three elements needed to run an engine. If any of the three elements are missing, you are obviously in trouble. This page is designed to help you solve the most important problems that arise on a daily basis.


A very clean, one-of-a-kind outboard fuel system can confuse the average person when diagnosing. For example: A common fuel problem can sometimes be due to ignition or even compression. For this reason, it is recommended to check these simple things first. If the fire should be good for ALL cylinders, and the pressure is within the allowable range, and the difference between the cartridges is less than 15 pounds, the problem is most likely fuel related. Or clogged coalsPoor, weak or terrible pump, little or no fuel retention in the cylinder that pushes prime, faulty pressure light, non-vented water tank, blocked tank anti-siphon valve, loose fuel line connections, and many more can cause circumstances you may experience . When making a decision, remember to check the six must-haves before you start trading coins through trial and error. We receive many requests for test strategies for Johnson/Evinrude VRO engine oil injection systems. Below are two troubleshooting programs.
johnson motor outboard troubleshooting

F. I have an oil injected engine and I hear a beep but I don’t know if that should be enough reason for oil injection or overheating. How to find out which clay has become what?
A. The intermittent “beep…beep…beep” sound is actually related to oil injection. Continuous “peeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeee” should satisfy the overheat. The oil injection on all outboard motors will emit an intermittent beep when you experience the problem is that your engine is not getting oil, the oil level sensor is faulty, and the oil level in the rainwater tank is also low. If the oil level in the system is low, you have thirty days to 45 minutes of work before it runs out. In any case, if you hear an intermittent “beep…beep…beep” sound, always check that you know the key (low oil level or no oil) before continuing to operate the engine. Then, if you don’t understand the oil warning, your entire engine is doomed to a continuous system if the oil injection mechanism fails.

How do you diagnose a boat motor problem?

Check tank ventilation and hoses.Check this fuel connector.Check fuel filter/water separator.Check/replace secondary fuel filter.Check/replace air filter.Check spark plugs/ignition.Check/clean carburetor.

Question. My engine does not have the required injection. Do you have a procedure that I can use to deal with this particular situation?
A. Sure….check out these links: Standard Non-Oil Injected Fuel Water Pumps | (Carbs section coming soon!)


Ignition systems can make “serious” problems visible to the average person online, and these companies can cause a very wide range ofsymptoms. Overhead ignition systems are likely to be very different from all types of our vehicles. What makes your good engine not start, stop, run well up to certain RPMs, run poorly at all? First make sure the ignition is working properly and completely, no broken or damaged wires, very few short circuits, no unwanted sparking around the ignition wires, etc. Where customers have a risk associated with an ignition component, special equipment to test most parts of the system, such as stators, triggers and power supplies, methods in which you can choose to have these problems diagnosed by a qualified technician that suits you. Don’t listen to advice from the house next door, including “try to change this, or try to change that.” Replacing ignition parts by trial and error can get VERY EXPENSIVE if you don’t agree the first time, and aftermarket parts dealers DO NOT make money from electrical parts! It may be aboutone hundred to destroy the original idea that most people are trying to save a dollar. If you decide to diagnose and troubleshoot your outboard ignition system yourself, since you have access to test components, please follow the links below which contain valuable information to help you through the process.
Click on page numbers to navigate.
Tools and Tips Page #
Recommended tools/equipment 1
Testing tips for minimal test equipment 1A
Mercury/Mariner expansion (non-Japanese shipbuilding) Page #
Drum CD glows with dots 16
Ignition of CDs without dots 17-19
Ignition from a generator 20-27
Chrysler Troubleshooting Page#
Drum CD ignition 2
Magnapower II ignition 3
Capacitive discharge ignition with generator 4-5

Troubleshooting Johnson/Evinrude Page#
Drum CD ignition 28
Ignition by alternator 1972-78 with screw terminals 29-31
Generator Ignition 1978-99